Tackling Cancer Through Team Science

Fall 2017

For patients suffering from metastatic breast cancer, where the disease has spread throughout the body, the survival rate is only 22%. These women and men face ongoing treatment for the rest of their lives, often with harsh side effects. Although treatable, there is no cure for metastatic disease.

The University of Virginia Health System is working to change that, and has launched a clinical trial that uses groundbreaking focused ultrasound technology to target metastatic breast cancer and make tumors responsive to immunotherapy—without surgery.

Read More.

Investigator Profile: Richard Price, PhD

October 17, 2017.

Can focused ultrasound be used as a tool to allow therapeutic agents to reach deadly brain tumors? Is it possible to stop the progression and spread of breast cancer? If Parkinson’s disease is diagnosed early, could its effect on the brain be reversed? These questions and more are being tackled by scientists in the Price Laboratory at the University of Virginia’s Biomedical Engineering Department.

Read More.

Price Earns Inaugural Prize for Cancer Treatment Using Focused Ultrasound

October 11, 2017

The Focused Ultrasound Foundation announced that Richard Price, professor of biomedical engineering, radiology and radiation oncology, has been selected as the inaugural recipient of the $75,000 Andrew J. Lockhart Memorial Prize.

Terry and Eugene Lockhart, the parents of the award’s namesake, presented the prize on Oct. 2.

Read More.

 

 

Bioinsights Story on Our Nano Letters Parkinson’s Gene Therapy Paper

Spring 2017

Researchers at the University of Virginia have developed a novel, non-invasive approach to deliver therapeutic gene and restore dopaminergic neuron function in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The approach used a combination of magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) and brain-penetrating nanoparticles (BPN).

Read More.

 

Brain-penetrating nanoparticles restore neuron function

May 25, 2017

Researchers at the University of Virginia and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore have developed a new, non-invasive and non-toxic genetic therapeutic technique to restore dopaminergic neuron function in rats suffering from Parkinson’s disease.

Read more

 

Focused Ultrasound Foundation teams up on melanoma brain metastases research

20 August 2015

The Melanoma Research Alliance (MRA) and Cancer Research Institute (CRI) are collaborating with the Foundation to fund a new preclinical research project using focused ultrasound to enhance immunotherapy for melanoma brain metastases.

Read More.

 

 

U.Va. And Hopkins Collaborate To Use Fus To Deliver Nanoparticles Into The Brain

June 25, 2015.

Biomedical engineers at the University of Virginia (UVA) and John Hopkins University (JHU) have developed a prolific collaboration that has generated several long-term, multi-million-dollar focused ultrasound research grants.

Richard Price, PhD, Research Director of the UVA Focused Ultrasound Center and Justin Hanes, PhD, Director of the Center for Nanomedicine at the Wilmer Eye Institute and JHU School of Medicine, are developing nanoparticles that can be delivered deep into the brain with the assistance of focused ultrasound. Their work has earned them nearly $7 million of National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding from 2011 to 2020 to propel their discoveries to the clinic.

Read More.

UVA and Hopkins Collaborate to Use FUS to Deliver Nanoparticles into the Brain

 

June 16, 2015

Biomedical engineers at the University of Virginia (UVA) and Johns Hopkins University (JHU) have developed a prolific collaboration that has generated several long-term, multi-million-dollar focused ultrasound research grants.

Richard Price, PhD, Research Director of the UVA Focused Ultrasound Center and Justin Hanes, PhD, Director of the Center for Nanomedicine at the Wilmer Eye Institute and JHU School of Medicine, are developing nanoparticles that can be delivered deep into the brain with the assistance of focused ultrasound. Their work has earned them nearly $7 million of National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding from 2011 to 2020 to propel their discoveries to the clinic.

Read more

Save

Save

Save

Getting through to Brain Cancer

Spring 2015

The most common form of brain cancer, glioblastoma, unfortunately is also one of the most deadly and difficult to treat. The statistics are stark: It kills about 95 percent of its victims within five years of diagnosis.

Surgery and radiation have only limited effectiveness because glioblastoma is particularly aggressive, infiltrating brain tissue surrounding the primary tumor. The use of chemotherapy to destroy the invasive tendrils is equally ineffective. The blood–brain barrier — a coating of special cells around capillaries in the brain — keeps everything but a handful of necessary nutrients from crossing to the brain’s extracellular fluid from the blood.

Read more

Save

Save

Save

Tool Enables Better Delivery of Brain Cancer Treatment

June 5, 2014.

Unfortunately, the most common form of brain cancer, glioblastoma, is also one of the deadliest and most difficult to treat. The statistics are stark: it kills about 95 percent of its victims within five years of diagnosis.

Read More.

Foundation’s First Research Award Recipient, Richard Price, Receives $3.3 Million in Follow On Funding from the NIH

March 14, 2012.

Research activities at the Foundation’s first Center of Excellence, located at the University of Virginia, have once again made national news. The Center’s Research Director Richard J. Price, PhD and his collaborator at Johns Hopkins University, Justin Hanes, PhD, have received a $3.3 million, five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health.

Read More.

NIH Awards $3.3 Million Grant to Research Barrier-Breaking Brain Cancer Treatment

 

February 28, 2012

The most common primary brain cancer is glioblastoma, a highly aggressive and deadly form of tumor that kills about 95 percent of its victims within five years of diagnosis.

Like other brain cancers, it is extremely difficult to treat because glioblastomas are usually deeply embedded within healthy brain tissue and therefore nearly impossible to safely access. Chemotherapy drugs cannot reach these tumors because a membrane between the bloodstream and brain tissue, called the blood-brain barrier, blocks them.

Read more

Save

Save

Save

Save

Richard J. Price, Ph.D., receives Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award

January 21, 2011.

A University of Virginia researcher has received a 3-year grant from The Hartwell Foundation to further his research on an innovative method to treat pediatric brain tumors.

Read More.

Whoa, Baby! U.Va. Engineering Students Learn Design Process by Building Off-Road Strollers

 

December 9, 2010

Books and lectures are just the starting points for learning how to design and build a new technology. Truly learning engineering design methods requires getting your hands on power tools, and sometimes welding torches.

As part of their first-year “Introduction to Engineering” course, students from the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science learned the design process by building, and racing, off-road baby strollers.

Read more

Save

Save